Latest Tweets:

Social media still a mystery for Canadian company directors

While 21 per cent of directors say online communication is important to their boards, there is a large number that does not believe it will be important for another few years.

Really? I disagree. I think now, more than ever, social media is critical for the success of businesses in the current marketplace.

What are your thoughts?

The Ray Dennis Experience: The 80 Rules of Social Media

jeremywaite:

image

The inventor of the web as we know it, Sir Tim Berners-Lee said recently that his next mission was “to bring about world peace”. Seriously. He believes that if people talk to each other, listen and understand each others problems, then they are less likely to shoot each…

Ten Myths About Social Networking For Business - In Photos: 10 Myths About Social Networking For Business

Such a great article. Does your business use social media? Is it doing it effectively? Talk about it here.

*14

yawnson:

corycoletta:

yawnson:

corycoletta:

#CONNECTED

A few weeks ago, a major event happened on the campus of my university. It brought attention to the school that is often not seen: roads were closed, a helicopter landed on our school sports field, emergency vehicles were everywhere, and our parking lots were closed.

That evening, I had a conversation with a student who I live with in residence. She had gone home for the weekend, and a conversation about the situation at our school was brought up.

Her father’s girlfriend’s daughter’s boyfriend knows me, and in this conversation, it was discovered. How? Social media, of course. I posted about the event on Twitter, which he saw, associated it with Laurier, and associated that with who he was talking to. Amazing.

This definitely demonstrates how social media can reach so many different audiences, how far that reach is, and how social media keeps this world connected. If Twitter didn’t exist, the resident of my building and I would have never known we had this close degree of separation.

My question for you: Is it scary or exciting that we are so connected?

Please share your thoughts!

I’m going to toss in some botched cyborg theory here, because I totally don’t understand cyborg theory (but really who does). In fact, it’s probably not this theory at all … and just my mindless ramblings dressed up as something academic. But enough preface and pre-emptive apologizing. 

I find it very interesting that as more and more social media platforms are being created and used by the masses, our ability to form and sustain relationships are being modified by the technologies that we have created. There’s all these statistics about the rise of successful online relationships,  and amazing stories of people using social media to reconnect with old friends or discover their amazing family genealogies. My point is, that our human ability to form relationships have, to some degree, become dependent on these social media technologies.

Our communities have moved into virtual communities, where our relationships are place precariously at the end of an internet connection, a keystroke and the fruitful use of emoticons. We are able to interact with so many different people, from so many different perspectives and geographic locations, through this medium. 

I don’t know how to conclude or summarize my thoughts, but I think it is very interesting that our social nature is rapidly becoming cyborg-like as technology improves. I wonder what relationship building, testimony and memory archiving will look like to the next generation. 

That’s all Cory!

Jan,

What you said here really has some interesting perspective. I think you’re right, we are definitely relying on technologies to fuel or perhaps catalyze our relationships with others.

From your perspective: are these online interactions benefiting or inhibiting these relationships? Can we share enough about ourselves online to establish meaningful relationships, or even, do we do share too much that it hurts us?

I think it’s a double-edged sword. I think we are benefitting by using these tools to cultivate relationships with people. These tools allow people to connect with folks, familiar or not, from around the world. But, I think what happens though, is that when we vet what we put online, we portray an ideal of who we wish to be. This occurs from catfish scenarios to the idea that I can delay my response to people’s comments, choosing to respond in ways that align with my desired online image. 

If we can argue that the person who put online is not, in all aspects, the “genuine” us, then to what extent are the online relationships we form with others genuine? Is there dissonance from the virtual relationships to the real-world relationships? Is the goal of social media to take these relationships offline? 

In regards to sharing, personally, I don’t share too much about myself online, just a lot of buzzfeed articles. But, when I do share things, I get a kick out of when people “like” something on my facebook feed. Which sort of ties into my previous post, when did we become complicit with clicking a “like” button to endorse something rather than saying “Wow, what you shared was great!” 

This concludes my 2 am ramblings. 

Side note: Cory, get the #connected learning community in on your blog discussions. 

These relationships, in my personal opinion, are not the most genuine if not formed from genuine representations of ourselves, online. If the goal of social media is to bring these relationships offline at some point, then there is definitely a shock to come when one’s true self is exhibited in reality, without the ability to “perfect” their image.

In terms of likes: If someone get 20 likes, they can feel very well-liked, feel supported, cared for, and respected, if their opinions are “liked.” Does this mean this support, care, and “liking” translates to real life? Or, is this a false representation of the support one has?

*14

allriversruntothesea:

corycoletta:

#CONNECTED

A few weeks ago, a major event happened on the campus of my university. It brought attention to the school that is often not seen: roads were closed, a helicopter landed on our school sports field, emergency vehicles were everywhere, and our parking lots were closed.

That evening, I had a conversation with a student who I live with in residence. She had gone home for the weekend, and a conversation about the situation at our school was brought up.

Her father’s girlfriend’s daughter’s boyfriend knows me, and in this conversation, it was discovered. How? Social media, of course. I posted about the event on Twitter, which he saw, associated it with Laurier, and associated that with who he was talking to. Amazing.

This definitely demonstrates how social media can reach so many different audiences, how far that reach is, and how social media keeps this world connected. If Twitter didn’t exist, the resident of my building and I would have never known we had this close degree of separation.

My question for you: Is it scary or exciting that we are so connected?

Please share your thoughts!

Its both terrifying and liberating. We have always been connected, its just getting easier to see the connections that have always existed and for them to grow and reproduce. Its also making it easier for the weaknesses and vulnerabilities we have always had to be exploited with increasing anonymity. As I post this, I know that many people that I may not be totally comfortable sharing my life with will have access to my tumblr url and its entire 5 year history of my posts. Things that I regret, things that I would rather have no one see again are public, and while I have made my peace with that by changing my current practices, its humbling to know that these tools that bring us into relationship can also be used for serious harm. 

And that’s without going into how people are mistaking contact over social media with real relationships. The occasional “hey” “hey” conversation on facebook or political debate on Twitter is no replacement for real human connection (in whatever form that takes for the individual in question). I don’t think I’m reading too far into statistics on anxiety, depression, and loneliness to think that the invention and developed ubiquity of the internet had something to do with it. 

Don’t get me wrong, I love the internet and social media. It has brought me great comfort and support in many times of need. It has given me an outlet at times when I have needed it and it has allowed me the chance to stay in contact with people that in other time I may have lost contact with due to distance. But there are concerns with this #connected world. 

Great thoughts here - I love how you say it is easier to see the connections grow and reproduce.

In addition - your history online, great point. In life, we can forget our past, but social media does not allow for that: positive or negative effect?

Thanks for your points!

*14

flowersfairytalesforevers:

corycoletta:

yawnson:

corycoletta:

#CONNECTED

A few weeks ago, a major event happened on the campus of my university. It brought attention to the school that is often not seen: roads were closed, a helicopter landed on our school sports field, emergency vehicles were everywhere, and our parking lots were closed.

That evening, I had a conversation with a student who I live with in residence. She had gone home for the weekend, and a conversation about the situation at our school was brought up.

Her father’s girlfriend’s daughter’s boyfriend knows me, and in this conversation, it was discovered. How? Social media, of course. I posted about the event on Twitter, which he saw, associated it with Laurier, and associated that with who he was talking to. Amazing.

This definitely demonstrates how social media can reach so many different audiences, how far that reach is, and how social media keeps this world connected. If Twitter didn’t exist, the resident of my building and I would have never known we had this close degree of separation.

My question for you: Is it scary or exciting that we are so connected?

Please share your thoughts!

I’m going to toss in some botched cyborg theory here, because I totally don’t understand cyborg theory (but really who does). In fact, it’s probably not this theory at all … and just my mindless ramblings dressed up as something academic. But enough preface and pre-emptive apologizing. 

I find it very interesting that as more and more social media platforms are being created and used by the masses, our ability to form and sustain relationships are being modified by the technologies that we have created. There’s all these statistics about the rise of successful online relationships,  and amazing stories of people using social media to reconnect with old friends or discover their amazing family genealogies. My point is, that our human ability to form relationships have, to some degree, become dependent on these social media technologies.

Our communities have moved into virtual communities, where our relationships are place precariously at the end of an internet connection, a keystroke and the fruitful use of emoticons. We are able to interact with so many different people, from so many different perspectives and geographic locations, through this medium. 

I don’t know how to conclude or summarize my thoughts, but I think it is very interesting that our social nature is rapidly becoming cyborg-like as technology improves. I wonder what relationship building, testimony and memory archiving will look like to the next generation. 

That’s all Cory!

Jan,

What you said here really has some interesting perspective. I think you’re right, we are definitely relying on technologies to fuel or perhaps catalyze our relationships with others.

From your perspective: are these online interactions benefiting or inhibiting these relationships? Can we share enough about ourselves online to establish meaningful relationships, or even, do we do share too much that it hurts us?

It’s Katy Here - Don’t mind my wedding planning blog.

Social media is a real gift, and it is so exciting to see how connected that social media can allow us to be Universally. I am always amazed when showing my parents another area of social media, and how it opens their eyes to the accessibility and benefits of it. I am in awe of it and the ability to keep lasting contact globally to those you care about.

Now, of course it has its downfalls; but what doesn’t. Since, it is so easy to share anything online and connect people in groups and locations, it can be a major safety threat to the people using the sites. There is also the lost idea of speaking face to face, and having one on one conversations instead of over a screen. To think that writing someone a note is almost romanticized now because it is so uncommon is an interesting idea.

Food for thought.

Katy, great points! I totally agree, my parents and even grandparents are mesmerized by the capabilities of social media. They love how it connects me with friends around the world as they travel or move, and how there is no disconnect any more. Maybe there is, and we’re missing it though. Katy, is this global connection also romanticized? How connected are we really? Does social media allow for true, meaningful relationships to develop?

*1

Twitter sets $17 to $20 per share price range for IPO

The social media giant to go public, start between $17 and $20… what do you think of this pricepoint?

*3

Facebook apologizes for a morning of technical problems | Toronto Star

Error message says, There was a problem updating your status.

Early Monday morning, Facebook was experiencing some technical difficulties, and it made headline news.

Today’s world is so involved in social media that the slightest error from a platform will cause an international eruption of news coverage. Facebook experienced this issue on Monday morning when their status feature failed to feature new posts from its users.

Question: What does it say about our society that Facebook’s status updating glitch gets headline coverage, over the world issues of the day (for example, a United States school shooting [http://www.foxnews.com/us/2013/10/21/police-respond-to-reports-shooting-at-nevada-middle-school/])?

*14

yawnson:

corycoletta:

#CONNECTED

A few weeks ago, a major event happened on the campus of my university. It brought attention to the school that is often not seen: roads were closed, a helicopter landed on our school sports field, emergency vehicles were everywhere, and our parking lots were closed.

That evening, I had a conversation with a student who I live with in residence. She had gone home for the weekend, and a conversation about the situation at our school was brought up.

Her father’s girlfriend’s daughter’s boyfriend knows me, and in this conversation, it was discovered. How? Social media, of course. I posted about the event on Twitter, which he saw, associated it with Laurier, and associated that with who he was talking to. Amazing.

This definitely demonstrates how social media can reach so many different audiences, how far that reach is, and how social media keeps this world connected. If Twitter didn’t exist, the resident of my building and I would have never known we had this close degree of separation.

My question for you: Is it scary or exciting that we are so connected?

Please share your thoughts!

I’m going to toss in some botched cyborg theory here, because I totally don’t understand cyborg theory (but really who does). In fact, it’s probably not this theory at all … and just my mindless ramblings dressed up as something academic. But enough preface and pre-emptive apologizing. 

I find it very interesting that as more and more social media platforms are being created and used by the masses, our ability to form and sustain relationships are being modified by the technologies that we have created. There’s all these statistics about the rise of successful online relationships,  and amazing stories of people using social media to reconnect with old friends or discover their amazing family genealogies. My point is, that our human ability to form relationships have, to some degree, become dependent on these social media technologies.

Our communities have moved into virtual communities, where our relationships are place precariously at the end of an internet connection, a keystroke and the fruitful use of emoticons. We are able to interact with so many different people, from so many different perspectives and geographic locations, through this medium. 

I don’t know how to conclude or summarize my thoughts, but I think it is very interesting that our social nature is rapidly becoming cyborg-like as technology improves. I wonder what relationship building, testimony and memory archiving will look like to the next generation. 

That’s all Cory!

Jan,

What you said here really has some interesting perspective. I think you’re right, we are definitely relying on technologies to fuel or perhaps catalyze our relationships with others.

From your perspective: are these online interactions benefiting or inhibiting these relationships? Can we share enough about ourselves online to establish meaningful relationships, or even, do we do share too much that it hurts us?

*14

itskylemccord:

corycoletta:

#CONNECTED

A few weeks ago, a major event happened on the campus of my university. It brought attention to the school that is often not seen: roads were closed, a helicopter landed on our school sports field, emergency vehicles were everywhere, and our parking lots were closed.

That evening, I had a conversation with a student who I live with in residence. She had gone home for the weekend, and a conversation about the situation at our school was brought up.

Her father’s girlfriend’s daughter’s boyfriend knows me, and in this conversation, it was discovered. How? Social media, of course. I posted about the event on Twitter, which he saw, associated it with Laurier, and associated that with who he was talking to. Amazing.

This definitely demonstrates how social media can reach so many different audiences, how far that reach is, and how social media keeps this world connected. If Twitter didn’t exist, the resident of my building and I would have never known we had this close degree of separation.

My question for you: Is it scary or exciting that we are so connected?

Please share your thoughts!

I don’t so much find it scary that we’re all connected, because without social media we are connected. It’s not the social media that connects us it’s our lives and relationships with each other. In my opinion, social media has it’s downsides like bullying and negativity and lack of security, but at the end of the day it feels great to know you have a closer connection with someone because they know a friend of yours from high school, or a family friend, or someone who worked with or lived beside or WHATEVER. Social media has made us more aware of how connected we all are and has broken that barrier that can stand between us and that person we’re dying to get closer with.

Kyle, great perspective. I love what you’re saying here. I pose this question to you though: yes, we are desperately seeking closeness with other human beings, but is there a true closeness in this online connectivity, or is it an exaggeration?